This project is funded under Socio-economic Sciences and Humanities
 
 


 
Media Policy Makers Researchers Civil Society Organizations
 
 
   Login
Password
LogOn  Register
Lost Password
 

GEMMA
Enhancing Evidence Based Policy-Making in Gender and Migration

What is GEMMA?

GEMMA objectives…we have a dream!

GEMMA activities

Who will benefit from GEMMA?

Offered opportunities

Why put Gender and Migration together?

What is GEMMA?

GEMMA is a project carried out by 5 European organizations with the support and collaboration of the European Commission – Directorate General Research - Unit L Science, Economy and Society.

GEMMA objectives…we have a dream!

The overall objective of GEMMA is to improve coordination between researchers, policy-makers and civil society organizations in the field of Gender and Migration.
In particular GEMMA aims at improving access to synthesized EC-funded Gender and Migration research results and related policy recommendations for policy-makers and civil society organizations at national level in GEMMA’s 5 partner countries.

What GEMMA dreams about:

Increased absorption of research by society
Better informed public opinion
Improved debate and better policy discussion and outcomes in Europe

GEMMA activities

In particular GEMMA will be dealing with:

DISSEMINATION: assuring increased dissemination and valorization of synthesized FP5 and FP6 research results in Gender and Migration to policy-makers and civil society organizations in GEMMA’s 5 Member States and languages

POLICY-MAKERS & RESEARCHERS: developing 5 national strategies to enhance networking and communication between researchers and policy-makers in the field of Gender and Migration

CIVIL SOCIETY ORGANIZATIONS & RESEARCHERS: developing 5 national strategies to enhance networking and communication between researchers and Civil Society Organizations working in the field of Gender and Migration

Who will benefit from GEMMA?

Policy-makers: need information to make decisions and formulate policy. Policy-makers have research needs but the lack of structured communication between them and the researchers make the needs rarely voiced.

Civil Society Organizations: can be both users and producers of research results. They can stimulate well-informed debate and policies related to Gender and Migration issues.

Researchers: are both users and producers of research results. The state of the art of any quality research project is defined by existing knowledge produced by multiple groups of researchers.

Offered opportunities

Opportunities for networking and dialogue between researchers, policy-makers and Civil Society Organizations through a series of workshops

Policy briefs – a synthesis instrument that enhance the visibility and access to research results for policy-makers, the media and civil society

GEMMA Solutions pack composed by: GEMMA abstract, thematic Policy briefs and a Policy Review

Dissemination through:

Why put Gender and Migration together?

First the recognition that issues of Gender and Migration are inextricably linked. Indeed, they are both concerned with the concept of equity in citizenship in the EU and must both strive to promote diversity and social inclusion for all citizens be they male or female or of European origin or not.

The following considerations were taken into account in making this choice.

A. Migration is one of the most significant global issues. There are now approximately 192 million people living outside their place of birth, which is about 3% of the world’s population.

Roughly 1 out of every 35 people in the world is a migrant. Between 1965 and 1990, the number of international migrants increased by 45 million. This represented an annual growth rate of 2.1%. Today the annual growth rate is estimated at 2.9%. Today, half of these 192 million people, (at least 95 million ) are women. According to the International Organisation for Migration (IOM), in Europe, 52% of internal migrants are thought to be women.

B. There are strong and diffused perceptions that migration processes are male.” Contradictory media discourses often inaccurately portray female migration and drive policy development. On the one hand, migrant women are seen as contributing to the labour force, especially in sectors that have been somewhat rejected by European workers (such as domestic work and elderly care) and in the health sector which has suffered welfare state crises in several countries. On the other hand, they are viewed as uneducated and problematic for integration purposes. Such perceptions have led to the tightening of family migration regulations and a re-orientation of immigration policies away from family streams and towards only skilled migrants.

C. Within Framework Programmes (FP5 and FP6) research, interest in gendered migrations is growing. The results of FP5 and FP6 projects such as FEMAGE and FEMIPOL and several IMISCOE clusters are focused on the issue of gendered migrations. The results will be invaluable to policy-making processes and targeted dissemination of synthesized results needs to be ensured. (For more information on the European Research Programs http://cordis.europa.eu/en/home.html).

D. Other programmes, donors and institutions are also financing and implementing research projects concerning gendered migrations.